Museums

WHERE OUR HISTORY LIVES.

Each Louisiana State Museum location holds a place of its own in the state’s rich history. These remarkable sites are woven into the fabric of the French Quarter, nestled on the banks of scenic Bayou Lafourche in rural Cajun country and an award-winning masterpiece in northwest Louisiana.

They’re part of a system of National Historic Landmarks showcasing Louisiana’s history and culture, which are unlike any other state.

The Cabildo, the Presbytère, 1850 House, Madame John’s Legacy and the Old U.S. Mint comprise a remarkable historical legacy of structures dating to the 18th century in New Orleans’ historic French Quarter, which is a living museum itself.

In Baton Rouge, the Capitol Park Museum—the largest Louisiana State Museum site—explores Louisiana culture, combing the rich resources of the state’s history, food, music, industry and agriculture to tell the compelling story of Louisiana and its people.

The Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame and Northwest Louisiana History Museum is housed in a stunning, award-winning contemporary structure in Natchitoches. This collection honors elite Louisiana athletes and documents the rich traditions and distinct cultures of northwest Louisiana, which date to the pre-Columbian era.

The Wedell-Williams Aviation and Cypress Sawmill Museum in Patterson is the official state aviation and cypress sawmill industry museum. It houses two very important collections documenting our history in the early years of flight and in the development of milling in south Louisiana.

The E.D. White Historic Site near Thibodaux preserves the former home of two of Louisiana's foremost political figures: Edward Douglas White, who was governor from 1835 to 1839, and his son, Edward Douglass White, who was appointed to the United States Supreme Court in 1894 and served as chief justice from 1910 to 1921. The home dates anywhere from the late 18th century to the 1820s, based on its architectural features.

Visit our locations and see how Louisianans have lived and continue to live, contributing as few have to America’s identity, soul and energy.